Headstone Foundations

Concrete Headstone
Bases in Buckhurst Hill

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Cemetery Concrete Headstone Bases in Buckhurst Hill

Pouring a foundation for a headstone in Buckhurst Hill is as simple as forming a slab of concrete. But if you want the foundation to last for a long time, there are other things that you can do to make the foundation stronger so it will last longer.

A strong foundation will not begin to crack and crumble in the next few decades. Keep in mind that there are hundreds of variations in headstone shape, material make-up, and size. Customize the size and depth of the headstone foundation based on these factors.

Headstone Concrete Bases Foundation for Buckhurst Hill

A slab foundation is a large, thick slab of concrete that is typically 4”-6” thick in the center and poured directly on the ground all at one time. The edges of the slab are thicker (as wide as 24”) in order to allow for extra strength around the perimeter.

A concrete slab foundation is most commonly constructed on property that has been graded, as it should be. It is very important that the soil be graded because if it’s not, the foundation could sink or settle due to poor soil compaction.

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    Facts About Buckhurst Hill

    Buckhurst Hill History

    The first mention of Buckhurst Hill is in 1135 when the reference was made to “La Bocherste”, becoming in later years “Bucket Hill”, originally meaning a hill covered with beech trees. It lay in Epping Forest and consisted of only a few scattered houses along the ancient road from Woodford to Loughton. Before the building of the railways, Buckhurst Hill was on the stagecoach route between London and Cambridge, Norwich, Bury St Edmunds and Dunmow. Originally it was a part of the parish of Chigwell; there was no road connecting the two communities and in order to get to church, parishioners had to ford the River Roding at Woodford. The Parish Church of St John was built in 1838 as a chapel of ease but Buckhurst Hill did not become a separate ecclesiastical parish until 1867.

    The opening of Buckhurst Hill Station in 1856 saw a rapid expansion in the population of the area; nearly six hundred new houses had been built near the station by 1871. Some of the land for this expansion was enclosed from Epping Forest, before this practise was halted by the Epping Forest Act, 1878. The civil parish of Buckhurst Hill became Buckhurst Hill Urban District in 1894. In 1933, it was merged with the Chigwell and Loughton Urban District to form the Chigwell Urban District. A further merger with Epping Urban District, Waltham Holy Cross Urban District and most of Epping and Ongar Rural District in 1974 brought Buckhurst Hill into Epping Forest District, and in 1996, Buckhurst Hill Parish Council was established as the first tier of local government.

    General Info

    Buckhurst Hill is served by two London Underground stations: Buckhurst Hill and Roding Valley, which are on the Central Line. The line directly links the area to central London, as well as local areas including Woodford, South Woodford, Leytonstone, Epping and Loughton. Also, from nearby Chingford station, services can be used to reach London Liverpool Street via Walthamstow and Hackney. Bus service 397 can be used to reach Chingford station. Most bus routes serving Buckhurst Hill are London Buses services.

    Headstone Concrete Bases Buckhurst Hill