Headstone Foundations

Concrete Headstone
Bases in Herne Hill

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Cemetery Concrete Headstone Bases in Herne Hill

Pouring a foundation for a headstone in Herne Hill is as simple as forming a slab of concrete. But if you want the foundation to last for a long time, there are other things that you can do to make the foundation stronger so it will last longer.

A strong foundation will not begin to crack and crumble in the next few decades. Keep in mind that there are hundreds of variations in headstone shape, material make-up, and size. Customize the size and depth of the headstone foundation based on these factors.

Headstone Concrete Bases Foundation for Herne Hill

A slab foundation is a large, thick slab of concrete that is typically 4”-6” thick in the center and poured directly on the ground all at one time. The edges of the slab are thicker (as wide as 24”) in order to allow for extra strength around the perimeter.

A concrete slab foundation is most commonly constructed on property that has been graded, as it should be. It is very important that the soil be graded because if it’s not, the foundation could sink or settle due to poor soil compaction.

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    Facts About Herne Hill

    Herne Hill History

    By the mid-19th century, the road from the modern Herne Hill Junction to Denmark Hill was lined with large residential estates and the area had become a prosperous suburb for the merchant class. Herne Hill was transformed by the arrival of the London, Chatham & Dover Railway in 1862. Cheap and convenient access to London Victoria, the City of London, Kent and south-west London created a demand for middle-class housing.

    A letter reporting a Herne Hill sighting of Victorian folklore demon Spring-heeled Jack, “that malapropre fellow of the ghost”, was published in the Camberwell and Peckham Times on 9 November 1872. The incident was recorded as taking place where the footpath on Herne Hill ran past St.Paul’s Church into Half Moon Lane. Herne Hill escaped lightly from V-weapons attacks during World War II, with five V-1 flying bombs and six deaths recorded.

    General Info

    Herne Hill is a district in South London, England, approximately four miles from Charing Cross and bordered by Brixton, Denmark Hill, Dulwich Village, Loughborough Junction and Tulse Hill. It overlaps the boundary between the boroughs of Lambeth and Southwark. There is a road of the same name in the area, as well as a railway station.

    In Rocque’s 1746 map, the area is shown as “Island Green”, probably reflecting the presence of the River Effra and smaller tributaries. Early references to the area also use the form “Ireland Green”. The earliest documented reference to “Herne Hill” is in two fire insurance policies issued by the Sun Insurance Company in 1792.

    Headstone Concrete Bases Herne Hill