Headstone Foundations

Concrete Headstone
Bases in Leamouth

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Cemetery Concrete Headstone Bases in Leamouth

Pouring a foundation for a headstone in Leamouth is as simple as forming a slab of concrete. But if you want the foundation to last for a long time, there are other things that you can do to make the foundation stronger so it will last longer.

A strong foundation will not begin to crack and crumble in the next few decades. Keep in mind that there are hundreds of variations in headstone shape, material make-up, and size. Customize the size and depth of the headstone foundation based on these factors.

Headstone Concrete Bases Foundation for Leamouth

A slab foundation is a large, thick slab of concrete that is typically 4”-6” thick in the center and poured directly on the ground all at one time. The edges of the slab are thicker (as wide as 24”) in order to allow for extra strength around the perimeter.

A concrete slab foundation is most commonly constructed on property that has been graded, as it should be. It is very important that the soil be graded because if it’s not, the foundation could sink or settle due to poor soil compaction.

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    Facts About Leamouth

    Leamouth History

    Orchard Place was the name of its manor house on the spit; this had become an eponymous public house from 1800–60. When the docks were constructed, the area became isolated, with the only access via the dock road, from Poplar. Residents were engaged at the glassworks, the iron and engineering works, or the Samuda Brothers, Orchard House Yard and Thames Iron Works shipyards.

    When the Thames Plate Glass Works closed in 1874, many of the hands – who had migrated to the area from Tyneside and St Helens in the 1840s – followed the glassworks to New Albany, Indiana. To house the workers, there were about 100 small two-storied cottages – built from the 1820s and condemned in 1935.

    General Info

    Leamouth is a mixed-use development and historically a wharf in the Port of London in Blackwall. It lies on the west side of the confluence of the Bow Creek stretch of the Lea, and the River Thames. The neighbourhood consists of two small peninsulas, separated from the rest of Poplar by both the river and the remaining part of the East India Docks and became more seen as part of Canning Town.

    Its northern peninsula lies in a hairpin meander and is named Goodluck Hope after one of the adjacent reaches of the Lea, while the other is known as Orchard Place. The area was long referred to locally as Bog Island, due to its inaccessibility and propensity to flood. However the building of the Thames Barrier and the artificial raising of the more vulnerable riverside land. Meaning the nickname refers to a now much-reduced threat.

    Headstone Concrete Bases Leamouth